eLetters

86 e-Letters

published between 2005 and 2008

  • Smoke sensitivity versus corticosteroid insensitivity in asthma
    Daniel K C Lee

    Dear Editor,

    The study by Tomlinson and colleagues [1] stirs further debate in relation to patients with asthma who continue to smoke. There are several points in the study, which are pertinent to consider.

    Firstly, the small but statistically significant difference of 25 l/min in morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) observed between smokers and non-smokers following 12 weeks of low dose inhaled corticoste...

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  • SOS: in great need of your help
    Wangshuchang Liuchang

    Dear Editor,

    I am a graduate student in Hebei Medical University in China. Now I am preparing for my trial, which is related to ec-sod. Although I have made my greatest efforts, I cannot find how to measure the activity and concentration of the plasm ec-sod. Many related articles cited the article "Quantitative and qualitative changes of extracellular-superoxide dismutase in patients with various diseases" Clinica Chi...

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  • The role of exhaled nitric oxide in asthma
    Daniel K C Lee

    Dear Editor,

    Berkman and colleagues [1] put forward an impressive argument for the use of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) in diagnosing asthma through employment of a cut off value of 7 parts per billion in differentiating between asthmatics and non-asthmatics.

    Although it is unquestionable that elevated levels of eNO indicate underlying airway inflammation, it must be appreciated that the latter is not syno...

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  • Respiratory muscle strength and vascular risk: the potential role of diabetes
    Filippo Luca Fimognari

    Dear Editor,

    In a recent issue of Thorax, van der Palen et al. [1] published a study showing that a reduced Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP), a measure of diaphragmatic inspiratory muscle strength, is a risk factor for incident myocardial infarction and death from cardiovascular disease in a population of subjects without previously reported cardiovascular events. We believe this result has a strong impact on...

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  • Towards "micro-nodular" lung cancer resection
    Calvin S.H. Ng

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the editorial by Birring and Peake on early diagnosis and screening of lung cancer [1]. The diagnosis of lung cancer is often delayed by the patient themselves, although some doctors are still guilty of adopting the laissez-faire approach towards small, particularly calcified lesions. As clinicians, we are increasingly seeing referrals of incidental small lung nodules on computed...

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  • Side effects of oral appliances
    Murat Enoz

    Dear Editor,

    Obstructive sleep apnea is an increasingly well-recognized disease characterized by periodic collapse of the upper airway during sleep. This leads to either complete or partial obstruction of the airway, resulting in apneas, hypopneas, or both.

    Interest in oral applicance therapy for snoring and sleep apnea has increased recently. Johson et al. Examined the effect of mandibular protrusio...

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  • OSA patients with metabolic syndrome
    Murat Enoz

    Dear Editor,

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. As it is strongly associated with known cardiovascular risk factors, including obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia, OSA is an independent risk factor for hypertension and has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of congestive cardiac failure, pulmonary hypertension...

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  • Comparing lung cancer survival between nations requires careful scrutiny of data
    Wendy J Anderson

    Dear Editor,

    Re: Symptoms and the early diagnosis of lung cancer

    Five year survival of patients with Lung Cancer in the United Kingdom is disappointing and the comparisons made by Birring et al. [1] and others with some internationally published data have been consistently unfavourable [2]. Doctors and government bodies in the United Kingdom have searched for differences in patients, disease or treatmen...

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  • Re: Brave new world for interventional bronchoscopy
    Brendan P Madden

    Dear Editor,

    Dr Toma and colleagues [1] describe interesting directions along which fibreoptic bronchoscopy may develop. The authors quite rightly state that rigid bronchoscopy has largely fallen within the domain of thoracic surgeons. Furthermore the techniques available until relatively recently were limited. I think it appropriate to ask the question “will this situation change”? In my opinion it already has...

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  • Improving outcome and quality of life after pneumonectomy.
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor,

    As Professor Treasure observed in his editorial written in the BMJ this week pneumonectomy for cancer still has a postoperative mortality of 10% to 15% despite patients being rejected if their respiratory function is limited.

    Patients who cannot climb stairs before a pneumonectomy had "similar morbidity rates (31.1 vs. 35.6%, respectively, P=0.7), but higher mortality rates (15.6 vs. 4....

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