eLetters

86 e-Letters

published between 2005 and 2008

  • Twitch pressure of the mouth
    ZG Zheng

    Dear Editor,

    I have been working on the twitch pressure of mouth, diaphragmatic and tracheal (airway) for several years and had done the work about the relationship between the twitch pressure of mouth or the twitch pressure of tracheal and twitch pressure of diaphragmatic in ventilated patients because of respiratory failure or during general anaesthesia because of abdomen operation. Recently, when I read of t...

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  • Clinical criteria for remission
    anil kumar bhatia

    Dear Editor,

    I would like to share my views again after hearing from you that what clinical criteria and biochemical parameters for the remission in asthma have been used in your study. What partameters were compared for the asthma remission in spirometery values pre and post remission phases.

    In the complete clinical remission what predictors have been taken into consideration for the remission. No doubt remi...

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  • Stepping-down inhaled corticosteroid therapy in stable asthma: a secondary care perspective
    Daniel K C Lee

    Dear Editor,

    It is generally appreciated that the practice of stepping-down inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy in patients with stable asthma is poorly implemented, albeit in the background of limited evidence.1 Indeed, the appreciation for stepping-down ICS therapy once asthma control is attained is well established within the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines2 and has recently been...

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  • Holding chambers versus nebulisers for beta-agonist for asthma in the Accident & Emergency Unit
    Jacob M. Puliyel

    Dear Editor,

    The authors of the UK guidelines on asthma have asked for feedback based on audit.[1] The latest British guidelines for asthma management suggest that children with moderate exacerbation of asthma presenting to the accident and emergency unit (annexure 5) must be treated with beta agonists: 2 to 10 puffs via a spacer and re-assed after 15 minutes. This recommendation seems to be observed often in the...

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  • Comments on Thorax guide to assess the validity of genetic association studies
    Ahmed E Hegab

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest your approved guidance on the key issues which should be considered in preparing a genetic association studies to become acceptable for publication in Thorax [1-2]. While we agree with several points in this guidance, there are still several other points that we see as exaggerated or at best controversial.

    We even can see that in the eight genetic association studies p...

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  • CPAP compliance
    Murat Enoz

    Dear Editor,

    The combination of acute and chronic haemondynamic effects in obstructive sleep apnea have been associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accidents, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. It is necessary to provide appropriate treatment for Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).

    Most health care providers offer nasal continuous positive airway pressure...

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  • The limitations of palatal surgery for patients with OSA
    Murat Enoz

    Dear Editor,

    Obstructive sleep apnea is an increasingly well recognized disease characterized by periodic collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by periodic complete or partial upper airway obstruction during sleep, causing intermittent cessations of breathing or reductions in airflow despite ongoing respiratory effort. It’s defined by the presence of at least...

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  • Early onset of effect of salmeterol and fluticasone propionate in COPD
    Ben Ponsioen

    Dear Editor,

    Vestbo et al. did an interesting secondary analysis of the results of the Tristan study in outpatients aged 40-70 years, with COPD (FEV1= 25-70% predicted, and reversibity...

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  • Inhaled steroid and acute bronchodilation
    David E Simcock

    Dear Editor,

    Vestibo et al. report their surprise at the rapid effect of inhaled fluticasone propionate (FP) on symptoms of dyspnoea and PEFR improvements in COPD subjects.[1] A feasible explanation for their observation is suggested by considering the effects of FP on airway vascular biology in asthmatic and healthy individuals. The impressive work by Wanner et al. demonstrated that FP causes acute vasoconstrict...

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  • Asbestos and lung cancer
    Dr B Ronan O'Driscoll

    Dear Editor,

    The paper by Hessel and colleagues is a valuable summary of the somewhat conflicting literature concerning asbestos exposure and lung cancer risk in the absence of a clinical diagnosis of asbestosis. The authors rightly point out that the risk of lung cancer may be very different in patients exposed to different fibre types and with different degrees of fibrosis ranging from severe fibrosis on plain...

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