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Increased advanced glycation end product and meat consumption is associated with childhood wheeze: analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
  1. Jing Gennie Wang1,2,
  2. Bian Liu3,
  3. Francesca Kroll4,
  4. Corrine Hanson5,
  5. Alfin Vicencio6,
  6. Steven Coca7,
  7. Jaime Uribarri7,
  8. Sonali Bose1
  1. 1Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, New York, USA
  2. 2Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care Medicine and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  3. 3Department of Population Health Science and Policy, Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, New York, United States
  4. 4Krieger School of Arts and Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  5. 5Division of Medical Nutrition Education, College of Allied Health Professions, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  6. 6Division of Pediatric Pulmonology, Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, New York, United States
  7. 7Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, New York, United States
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sonali Bose, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, New York, USA; sonali.bose{at}mssm.edu

Abstract

We examined 4388 children from the 2003 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and used survey-design-adjusted multivariable logistic regression to evaluate associations between dietary advanced glycation end product (AGE) and meat consumption frequencies and respiratory symptoms. Higher AGE intake was significantly associated with increased odds of wheezing (adjusted OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.36), wheeze-disrupted sleep (1.26; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.51) and exercise (1.34; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.67) and wheezing requiring prescription medication (1.35; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.63). Higher intake of non-seafood meats was associated with wheeze-disrupted sleep (2.32; 95% CI 1.11 to 4.82) and wheezing requiring prescription medication (2.23; 95% CI 1.10 to 4.54).

  • asthma
  • asthma epidemiology
  • paediatric asthma
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Footnotes

  • Twitter @jing_gennieWang

  • Contributors JGW and SB took responsibility for the integrity of the data and accuracy of the analyses. SB, JGW and BL contributed to the conception of the study. BL, JGW and JU contributed to the data collection. BL, JGW, SC, FK, CH, AV and SB contributed to data analysis and interpretation. JGW and SB drafted the manuscript. All authors revised the manuscript for intellectual content and approved the final version of the manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests SC reports personal fees, equity and stock options from REnalytixAI, personal fees and stock options from pulseData and personal fees from CHF Solutions, Quark, Takeda, Janssen, Goldfinch, Relypsa and Bayer.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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