Article Text

PDF
Original article
The effect of early growth patterns and lung function on the development of childhood asthma: a population based study
  1. Maribel Casas1,2,3,4,5,
  2. Herman T den Dekker1,2,6,
  3. Claudia J Kruithof1,6,
  4. Irwin K Reiss7,
  5. Martine Vrijheid3,4,5,
  6. Jordi Sunyer3,4,5,
  7. Johan C de Jongste2,
  8. Vincent W V Jaddoe1,6,8,
  9. Liesbeth Duijts2,6,7
  1. 1 The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  2. 2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  3. 3 ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain
  4. 4 Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain
  5. 5 CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain
  6. 6 Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  7. 7 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  8. 8 Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to Dr Maribel Casas, The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam 3015 GD, The Netherlands; maribel.casas{at}isglobal.org

Abstract

Background Infant weight gain is associated with lower lung function and a higher risk of childhood asthma. Detailed individual childhood growth patterns might be better predictors of childhood respiratory morbidity than the difference between two weight and height measurements. We assessed the associations of early childhood growth patterns with lung function and asthma at the age of 10 years and whether the child’s current body mass index (BMI) influenced any association.

Methods We derived peak height and weight growth velocity, BMI at adiposity peak, and age at adiposity peak from longitudinally measured weight and height data in the first 3 years of life of 4435 children enrolled in a population-based prospective cohort study. At 10 years of age, spirometry was performed and current asthma was assessed by questionnaire. Spirometry outcomes included forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, and forced expiratory flow after exhaling 75% of vital capacity (FEF75).

Results Greater peak weight velocity was associated with higher FVC but lower FEV1/FVC and FEF75. Greater BMI at adiposity peak was associated with higher FVC and FEV1 but lower FEV1/FVC and FEF75. Greater age at adiposity peak was associated with higher FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and FEF75, particularly in children with a small size at birth, and lower odds of current asthma in boys. The child’s current BMI only explained the associations of peak weight velocity and BMI at adiposity peak with FVC and FEV1. Peak height velocity was not consistently associated with impaired lung function or asthma.

Conclusion Peak weight velocity and BMI at adiposity peak were associated with reduced airway patency in relation to lung volume, whereas age at adiposity peak was associated with higher lung function parameters and lower risk of asthma at 10 years, particularly in boys.

  • asthma
  • paediatric asthma

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Contributors MC and LD designed the study with contributions from and the approval of all the other co-authors. CJK obtained the data on early childhood growth patterns and prepared the dataset. MC performed all statistical analyses. MV, IKR and VWVJ contributed as experts on child growth, while HTdD, JS and JCdJ contributed as experts on child respiratory health. MC interpreted the data and wrote the first draft of the manuscript. LD directed the study, interpreted the data, and critically reviewed all versions of the manuscript. All authors reviewed the manuscript for important intellectual content, and carefully read and approved the final version.

  • Funding The Generation R Study is made possible by financial support from the Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, Erasmus University Rotterdam and the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development. Dr Liesbeth Duijts received additional funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 co-funded programme ERA-Net on Biomarkers for Nutrition and Health (ERA HDHL) (ALPHABET project (no. 696295; 2017), ZonMW The Netherlands (no. 529051014; 2017)). The study was supported by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (VIDI 016.136.361), a European Research Council Consolidator Grant (ERC-2014-CoG-648916), funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no. 289346 (EarlyNutrition), and funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreements no. 733206 (LifeCycle) and no. 633595 (DynaHEALTH). Dr Maribel Casas received funding from Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness) (CD12/00563 and MS16/00128). The researchers are independent from the funders.

  • Disclaimer The study sponsors had no role in the study design, data collection, data analysis, interpretation of data, and preparation, review or approval of the manuscript.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Parental/guardian consent obtained.

  • Ethics approval Medical Ethical Committee of the Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Author note The Generation R Study is conducted by the Erasmus Medical Centre in close collaboration with the School of Law and the Faculty of Social Sciences at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, the Municipal Health Service, Rotterdam area, and the Stichting Trombosedienst and Artsenlaboratorium Rijnmond (Star-MDC), Rotterdam.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles