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Massive haemoptysis TB or not TB
  1. Macarena R Vial1,
  2. Benjamin Horwitz2,
  3. Cristobal Ramos2,
  4. Karen Czischke1,
  5. Georgie Eapen3,
  6. Horiana B Grosu3
  1. 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Clínica Alemana de Santiago, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile
  2. 2Department of Radiology, Clínica Alemana de Santiago, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile
  3. 3Department of Pulmonary Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Macarena R Vial, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Clínica Alemana de Santiago, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile; mrodriguezvi{at}alemana.cl

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A young lifelong non-smoking patient presented to the emergency department after an episode of haemoptysis following a 2-month history of weight loss, cough and fever. He had a history of pulmonary tuberculosis during childhood, for which he completed 6 months of treatment. An initial non-contrast CT of the thorax revealed a right lower lobe opacity suggestive of necrotising pneumonia with an endobronchial lesion in the bronchus intermedius and associated mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy (figure 1). A subsequent CT angiogram revealed bilateral hypertrophic bronchial arteries and a 6 mm intrapulmonary pseudoaneurysm arising from the right bronchial artery (BA), forming …

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