Responses

COPD discharge bundle and pulmonary rehabilitation referral and uptake following hospitalisation for acute exacerbation of COPD
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • A rapid response is a moderated but not peer reviewed online response to a published article in a BMJ journal; it will not receive a DOI and will not be indexed unless it is also republished as a Letter, Correspondence or as other content. Find out more about rapid responses.
  • We intend to post all responses which are approved by the Editor, within 14 days (BMJ Journals) or 24 hours (The BMJ), however timeframes cannot be guaranteed. Responses must comply with our requirements and should contribute substantially to the topic, but it is at our absolute discretion whether we publish a response, and we reserve the right to edit or remove responses before and after publication and also republish some or all in other BMJ publications, including third party local editions in other countries and languages
  • Our requirements are stated in our rapid response terms and conditions and must be read. These include ensuring that: i) you do not include any illustrative content including tables and graphs, ii) you do not include any information that includes specifics about any patients,iii) you do not include any original data, unless it has already been published in a peer reviewed journal and you have included a reference, iv) your response is lawful, not defamatory, original and accurate, v) you declare any competing interests, vi) you understand that your name and other personal details set out in our rapid response terms and conditions will be published with any responses we publish and vii) you understand that once a response is published, we may continue to publish your response and/or edit or remove it in the future.
  • By submitting this rapid response you are agreeing to our terms and conditions for rapid responses and understand that your personal data will be processed in accordance with those terms and our privacy notice.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

  • Published on:
    Reply to: Referral to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) by a current PR practitioner has no effect on PR completion rate
    • Ruth E Barker, Physiotherapist Harefield Respiratory Research Group, Royal Brompton and Harefield Clinical Group, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

    We thank Dr Abdulqawi for interest in our work (1). He comments that the referral, uptake and completion rates for pulmonary rehabilitation in the current study were lower than in a previous study by Jones and colleagues (2). We would caution against retrospective comparison with unmatched historical controls due to confounding factors such as differences in patient characteristics and practice pathways that may contribute to inaccurate point estimates.

    We hypothesised that the COPD discharge bundle would impact on referral rates. Strengths of the current work include the prospective real-world nature of the study, with the research team having no involvement in treatment allocation. The clinical team delivering the bundle were blinded to the study objectives, thus minimising any Hawthorne effect.

    Dr Abdulqawi raises the point that pulmonary rehabilitation completion rates were low in the current study (albeit based on a low denominator). The reasons for non-completion of PR are often complex and multi-factorial (3) and may not be directly related to referral source. However, what is clear is that without a referral for pulmonary rehabilitation, uptake and completion rates are zero.

    1. Barker RE BL, Maddocks M, Nolan CM, Patel S, Walsh JA, Polgar O, Wenneberg J, Kon SSC, Wedzicha JA, Man WDC, Farquhar M. Integrating Home-Based Exercise Training with a Hospital at Home Service for Patients Hospitalised with Acute Exacerbations of COPD: Developing the M...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Referral to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) by a current PR practitioner has no effect on PR completion rate
    • Rayid Abdulqawi, Respiratory Medicine Consultant King Fahad Specialist Hospital - Dammam, Saudi Arabia

    We have read the paper by Barker et al. (1) with interest. We congratulate the authors for conducting and publishing their prospective cohort study evaluating the effect of COPD discharge bundle on pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) referral and uptake following hospitalisation for acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD).

    The authors have shown that the COPD discharge bundle had a positive effect on PR referral compared with a no bundle (17.5% (40 of 228) referral rate vs 0%(0 of 63)). This figure is lower than the expected 30% referral rate to PR following AECOPD (2). However, the paper offers no potential reasons for the lower referral rate.

    The study had two bundle groups:
    • COPD discharge bundle delivered by a current PR practitioner
    • COPD discharge bundle delivered by a practitioner with no involvement in PR

    Compared to delivery by a practitioner with no PR involvement, completion of the bundle delivery by a current PR practitioner resulted in higher referral and pick-up rates (60% vs 12% and 40% vs 32%, respectively). These results support the concept of integrating PR and hospital services.

    Unfortunately, the completion rate (number of subjects who completed PR divided by the number of referrals) was disappointingly low. Also, there was no difference between the two bundle groups (13% (2 of 15) vs 12% (3 of 25)), as stated in the supplementary data.

    It seems that patients' willingness or ability to complete PR is not af...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.