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Treating tuberculosis in low-resource settings: practice pragmatically
  1. Xiaohui Sun1,
  2. Najib M Rahman2,
  3. Abdel Douiri3,4,5
  1. 1 School of Population Health & Environmental Science, King's College London, London, United Kingdom
  2. 2 Oxford Respiratory Trials Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
  3. 3 School of Population Health & Environmental Sciences, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
  4. 4 National Institute for Health Research Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) South London, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
  5. 5 National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
  1. Correspondence to Dr Abdel Douiri, School of Population Health & Environmental Sciences, Kings College London, London SE1 1UL, UK; abdel.douiri{at}kcl.ac.uk

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Tuberculosis (TB) remains a long-standing life-threatening contagious disease and claimed approximately 1.5 million lives worldwide in 2018. Regional variations occur extensively with polarised incidence rates between low and high TB burden countries.1 TB is a social disease in partnership with poverty. TB burden fluctuates with the rises and falls of socioeconomic development despite the advancements in healthcare.2 Poverty-related components such as poor living conditions and malnutrition, which do not merely increase individual’s susceptibility to infection, but affect healthcare expenditure and loss of income associated with TB infection amplify the effect of poverty on TB treatment and prevention. Therefore, combating TB contributes to reducing impoverishment, meanwhile fighting impoverishment assists TB control efforts especially in restricted resource settings.3

A pragmatic …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors All authors (XS, NMR and AD) contributed equally.

  • Funding AD acknowledges the support and funding from the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South London at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and the Royal College of Physicians, as well as the support from the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre based at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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