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Correspondence
Peripheral airway/alveolar nitric oxide concentration in asthma
  1. Bruno Mahut1,
  2. Christophe Delclaux1,2,3
  1. 1Service de Physiologie, Clinique de la Dyspnée, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris, France
  2. 2CIC 9201 Plurithématique, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris, France
  3. 3Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France
  1. Correspondence to Professor Christophe Delclaux, Service de Physiologie, Clinique de la Dyspnée, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, 20, rue Leblanc, Paris 75015, France; christophe.delclaux{at}egp.aphp.fr

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We read with great interest the paper by Gelb and colleagues1 who suggest that peripheral airway/alveolar nitric oxide (NO) concentration after correction for axial NO back-diffusion (CalvNOcorrected) is normal during asthma exacerbation (with a hypothesis of an incidence of >30% of its increase). If one admits that an exacerbation constitutes the ultimate expression of loss of asthma control, their results are in line with ours demonstrating that CalvNOcorrected is not a marker of asthma control.2 Nevertheless, some of their patients with an exacerbation had an increase in CalvNOcorrected …

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Footnotes

  • Linked articles 148577.

  • Competing interests CD has received a free NO analyser (ENDONO 8000) from SERES (Aix en Provence, France) for the development of their software for NO analysis at multiple exhaled flow rates. BM has no competing interests.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; not externally peer reviewed.

Linked Articles

  • PostScript
    Arthur Franklin Gelb