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Significance of changes in endurance shuttle walking performance
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  1. Véronique Pepin1,2,
  2. Louis Laviolette3,4,
  3. Cynthia Brouillard4,
  4. Louise Sewell5,
  5. Sally J Singh5,
  6. Sue M Revill6,
  7. Yves Lacasse4,
  8. François Maltais4
  1. 1Axe de recherche en santé respiratoire, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, Montréal, Canada
  2. 2Department of Exercise Sciences, Concordia University, Quebec, Canada
  3. 3Université Paris VI, ER10UPMC, Laboratoire de Physiopathologie Respiratoire, Paris, France
  4. 4Centre de recherche, Institut Universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, Canada
  5. 5Pulmonary Rehabilitation Research Group, Institute for Lung Health, Department of Respiratory Medicine and Thoracic Surgery, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, UK
  6. 6Sherwood Forest Hospitals, Ashfield Community Hospital, Kirby-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr François Maltais, Centre de Pneumologie, Institut Universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Hôpital Laval, 2725 Chemin Ste-Foy, Ste-Foy, Québec, G1V 4G5, Canada; francois.maltais{at}med.ulaval.ca

Abstract

Background The endurance shuttle walking test (ESWT) has shown good responsiveness to interventions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the minimal important difference (MID) for this test remains unknown, therefore limiting its interpretability.

Methods Patients with COPD who completed two or more ESWTs following pulmonary rehabilitation (n=132; forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) 48±22%) or bronchodilation (n=69; FEV1 50±12%) rated their performance of the day in comparison with their previous performance on a 7-point scale ranging from −3 (large deterioration) to +3 (large improvement). The relationship between subjective perception of changes and objective changes in performance during the shuttle walk was evaluated.

Results Following pulmonary rehabilitation, the anchor-based approach did not allow a valid estimation of the MID in the ESWT performance to be obtained. After bronchodilation, patient ratings of change correlated significantly with the difference in walking distance (r=0.53, p<0.001) and endurance time (r=0.55, p<0.001). For the pharmacotherapy data, regression analysis indicated that a 65 s (95% CI 45 to 85) change in endurance time and a 95 m (95% CI 60 to 115) change in walking distance were associated with a 1-point change in the rating of change scale. These changes represented 13–15% of the baseline values.

Conclusions A change in endurance shuttle walking performance of 45–85 s (or 60–115 m) after bronchodilation is likely to be perceived by patients. This MID value may be specific to the intervention from which it was derived.

  • COPD
  • exercise
  • shuttle walking test
  • minimal important difference
  • COPD mechanisms
  • exercise
  • pulmonary rehabilitation
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Footnotes

  • VP and LL contributed equally to the work.

  • Funding VP is a research scholar of the Fonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec. FM holds a GSK/CIHR Research Chair on COPD at Université Laval. This work has been supported in part by CIHR grant MOP-84091.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval This study was conducted with the approval of the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Research Group, Institute for Lung Health, Department of Respiratory Medicine and Thoracic Surgery, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, UK; Sherwood Forest Hospitals, Ashfield Community Hospital, Kirby-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire, UK; and the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Canada.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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