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Exhaled nitric oxide measurements: clinical application and interpretation
  1. D R Taylor1,
  2. M W Pijnenburg2,
  3. A D Smith1,
  4. J C D Jongste2
  1. 1Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, P O Box 913, Dunedin, New Zealand
  2. 2Department of Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, Erasmus MC - Sophia Children’s Hospital, University Medical Centre, P O Box 2060, 3000 CB Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to:
    Professor D R Taylor
    Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, P O Box 913, Dunedin, New Zealand; robin.taylor{at}stonebow.otago.ac.nz

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: Professor Taylor has received funding from Aerocrine, a manufacturer of nitric oxide analysers.

  • Note: Unless otherwise stated, all FEno measurements are reported in parts per billion at a flow rate of 50 ml/s. In some instances corrections for flow rate have been made to ensure consistency and permit appropriate interpretation by the reader.

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests: Professor Taylor has received funding from Aerocrine, a manufacturer of nitric oxide analysers.

  • Note: Unless otherwise stated, all FEno measurements are reported in parts per billion at a flow rate of 50 ml/s. In some instances corrections for flow rate have been made to ensure consistency and permit appropriate interpretation by the reader.

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