Article Text

Download PDFPDF

A&E department: a missed opportunity for diagnosis of TB?
Free
  1. A Smith1,
  2. R F Miller2,
  3. A Story3,
  4. H L Booth4
  1. 1Department of Thoracic Medicine, University College Hospital, London, UK
  2. 2Department of Population Sciences and Primary Care, Royal Free and University College Medical School, University College London, London, UK
  3. 3Centre for Infections, Health Protection Agency, London, UK
  4. 4Department of Thoracic Medicine, University College Hospital, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr R F Miller
    Department of Population Sciences and Primary Care, Royal Free and University College Medical School, University College London, London WC1E 6AU, UK;rmiller{at}gum.ucl.ac.uk

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

The World Health Organization declared tuberculosis (TB) to be a global emergency in 1993. Since then there has been a resurgence of TB in England and Wales, particularly in London.1,2 Early diagnosis, particularly of infectious cases, is a major factor in the success of control programmes.3 In the UK, TB continues to disproportionately affect vulnerable groups—including the homeless, illicit drug users, alcoholics, and immigrants recently arrived from high prevalence countries. These groups frequently find it difficult to access appropriate health care and often rely on Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments for healthcare provision. We examined how frequently patients with TB attended the local A&E department before their diagnosis and whether their A&E attendances led to a diagnosis of TB being made.

From January 2001 to March 2002 there were 130 notifications of TB …

View Full Text