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Comparison of measured exhaled nitric oxide at varying flow rates
  1. D Menzies,
  2. T Fardon,
  3. P Burns,
  4. B J Lipworth
  1. Asthma & Allergy Research Group, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr D Menzies
    Asthma & Allergy Research Group, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK; d.menziesdundee.ac.uk

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Altered levels of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) have been well documented in a number of conditions, although it is in asthma that this phenomenon has been most extensively investigated.1 Raised FeNO levels in patients with asthma have been correlated not only with other markers of airway inflammation (including induced sputum eosinophil count), but also with airway hyperresponsiveness and response to inhaled corticosteroids.2 Furthermore, the detection of a raised FeNO level has been shown to have a positive predictive value of up to 95% for the diagnosis of asthma.3

A number of …

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