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Thinking outside the lungs: ‘other’ risk factors for pneumonia hospitalisation
  1. C I Bloom,
  2. J K Quint
  1. Department of Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr J K Quint, Department of Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Emmanuel Kaye Building, Imperial College London, London SW3 6LR, UK; j.quint{at}imperial.ac.uk

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The symptoms of pneumonic infection can be traced back through history; first being described during early Greek civilisation. But it wasn't until the 19th century the disorder was described in its own right, once causative bacteria were observed. Although mortality rates then rapidly declined, with the mass production of antibiotics, today it still remains a serious global problem.1

At the bedside, several determinants are now well recognised as severity markers for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), such as age >65 years, COPD, smoking and dementia.2 In addition, we all look out for immunosuppressive treatments, and appreciate infection is often more severe in people who are immunocompromised, but other factors, such as androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) may not usually be considered.

Respiratory clinicians are highly likely to treat patients with prostate cancer, the second most common cancer in the UK with a rapidly growing incidence (147/10 000 in 2014, predicted to be 233/100 000 in 2035).3 As prostate …

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