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MRI ventilation abnormalities predict quality-of-life and lung function changes in mild-to-moderate COPD: longitudinal TINCan study
  1. Miranda Kirby1,
  2. Rachel L Eddy2,3,
  3. Damien Pike2,3,
  4. Sarah Svenningsen2,3,
  5. Harvey O Coxson1,
  6. Don D Sin1,
  7. David G McCormack4,
  8. Grace Parraga2,3
  9. for the Canadian Respiratory Research Network
  1. 1Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  2. 2Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  3. 3Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  4. 4Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Grace Parraga, Robarts Research Institute, 1151 Richmond St N, London, ON N6A 5B7, Canada; gparraga{at}robarts.ca

Abstract

COPD biomarkers are urgently required for clinical trials of new therapies. We evaluated the longitudinal change and relationship of MRI and CT biomarkers of COPD with St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRO) and FEV1 worsening over 30 months. Among imaging biomarkers, only the longitudinal change in MRI ventilation defect percent (VDP) was greater in ever-smoker (n=34/p<0.05) and COPD (n=48/p<0.0001) subgroups compared with never-smokers (n=42). Only the longitudinal change in VDP was correlated with change in SGRQ (r=0.26/p=0.03), and only baseline VDP predicted longitudinal change in SGRQ>minimum clinically important difference (p=0.047) in mild-to-moderate COPD. These data strongly support the use of MRI intermediate endpoints in COPD studies.

Trial Registration Number NCT02723474; Status: Recruiting.

  • Imaging/CT MRI etc
  • Emphysema
  • Respiratory Measurement

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Footnotes

  • Collaborators Canadian Respiratory Research Network.

  • Contributors MK, RLE, DP and SS made substantial contributions to the design of the study, the analysis and interpretation of data, drafting and revising the manuscript critically for important intellectual content and final approval of the manuscript version to be published. HOC, DDS and DGMcC made substantial contributions to the interpretation of data, to revising the manuscript critically for important intellectual content and they provided final approval of the manuscript version submitted for publication. GP made substantial contributions to the design of the study, the analysis and interpretation of data, drafting and revising the manuscript for important intellectual content, final approval of the manuscript version to be published and has agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work, ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

  • Funding This study was also supported in part by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Team Grant (CIF# 97687) and the Canadian Respiratory Research Network (CRRN). CRRN is supported by grants from the CIHR—Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health, the Canadian Lung Association /Canadian Thoracic Society, the British Columbia Lung Association, Boehringer-Ingelheim Canada, AstraZeneca Canada and Novartis Canada.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Ethics approval Health Canada.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement Requests for data can be made to the corresponding author.

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