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Nasal high flow oxygen therapy in patients with COPD reduces respiratory rate and tissue carbon dioxide while increasing tidal and end-expiratory lung volumes: a randomised crossover trial

Authors

  • John F Fraser Critical Care Research Group, The Prince Charles Hospital and University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Amy J Spooner Critical Care Research Group, The Prince Charles Hospital and University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Kimble R Dunster Critical Care Research Group, The Prince Charles Hospital and University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Chris M Anstey Critical Care Research Group, The Prince Charles Hospital and University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia Intensive Care Unit, Nambour General Hospital, Nambour, Australia PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Amanda Corley Critical Care Research Group, The Prince Charles Hospital and University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  1. Correspondence to Amanda Corley, Critical Care Research Group, Level 5 CSB, The Prince Charles Hospital, Rode Rd, Chermside, Brisbane, QLD 4032, Australia; amanda.corley{at}health.qld.gov.au
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Citation

Fraser JF, Spooner AJ, Dunster KR, et al
Nasal high flow oxygen therapy in patients with COPD reduces respiratory rate and tissue carbon dioxide while increasing tidal and end-expiratory lung volumes: a randomised crossover trial

Publication history

  • Received 18 October 2015
  • Revised 22 February 2016
  • Accepted 26 February 2016
  • Published in print 1 August 2016.
  • Published online 14 July 2016.
  • Published first 25 March 2016.

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