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Seasonal variation in incidence of sarcoidosis: a population-based study, 1976–2013
  1. Patompong Ungprasert1,
  2. Cynthia S Crowson1,2,
  3. Eric L Matteson1,3
  1. 1 Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
  2. 2 Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Science Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
  3. 3 Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Science Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Patompong Ungprasert, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First avenue SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA; P.Ungprasert{at}gmail.com, Ungprasert.Patompong{at}mayo.edu

Abstract

Studies of seasonal patterns of incidence of sarcoidosis may provide a better understanding of potential environmental triggers of the disease. In this study, Olmsted County, Minnesota residents who were diagnosed with sarcoidosis between 1976 and 2013 were identified based on individual medical record review. The seasonal variation of incident sarcoidosis was then calculated. The age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence rate of sarcoidosis was lower in autumn (2.0/100 000; 95% CI 1.5 to 2.5) compared with winter (3.2/100 000; 95% CI 2.6 to 3.8), spring (2.8/100 000; 95% CI 2.2 to 3.4) and summer (2.9/100 000; 95% CI 2.2 to 3.5, p=0.024). Subgroup analysis per decade consistently showed lower incidence of sarcoidosis in autumn.

  • Sarcoidosis
  • Clinical Epidemiology

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Footnotes

  • Contributors PU: conception and design; acquisition and interpretation of data; drafting of the manuscript; statistical analysis. CSC: conception and design; analysis and interpretation of data; critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content; statistical analysis. ELM: conception and design; acquisition and interpretation of data; critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content; statistical analysis; supervision.

  • Funding This study used resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, which is supported by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01AG034676, and CTSA Grant Number UL1 TR000135 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval Mayo Clinic IRB and Olmsted County medical centre IRB.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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