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Correspondence
Risk factors for sleep-disordered breathing in pregnancy
  1. Karen Redhead1,
  2. Peter Eastwood1,2,
  3. Christopher Griffin3
  1. 1 Centre for Sleep Science, School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
  2. 2 West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
  3. 3 King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Karen Redhead, Centre for Sleep Science, School of Anatomy, Physiology & Human Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6024, Australia; Karen.redhead{at}research.uwa.edu.au

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The stimulating paper of Pien et al 1 reported the findings of a prospective cohort study of pregnant women examining risk factors for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). It was notable that, despite a marked increase in the number of women with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) from the first to third trimester (from 10.5% to 26.7%, respectively), there were no significant associations between any SDB variable and development of gestational hypertension or preeclampsia …

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