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Thorax 67:1102-1109 doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2012-201765
  • Reviews

Prospects for the development of effective pharmacotherapy targeted at the skeletal muscles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a translational review

  1. Michael I Polkey4
  1. 1Institute for Lung Health, Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, UK
  2. 2Musculoskeletal Translational Medicine, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
  3. 3GlaxoSmithKline, Respiratory Therapy Area Unit, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, USA
  4. 4NIHR Respiratory Biomedical Unit at the Royal Brompton Hospital and National Heart & Lung Institute, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Michael C Steiner, Institute for Lung Health, Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Glenfield Hospital, Groby Road, Leicester LE3 9QP, UK; michael.steiner{at}uhl-tr.nhs.uk
  1. Contributors All authors contributed to the drafting of this manuscript. MIP's contribution to this manuscript was supported by the NIHR Respiratory Disease Biomedical Research Unit at the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust and Imperial College London. MCS's contribution to this manuscript was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care based at Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Rutland. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

  • Received 15 February 2012
  • Accepted 9 April 2012
  • Published Online First 5 May 2012

Abstract

Skeletal muscle dysfunction is a prevalent and clinically important systemic manifestation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that predicts morbidity and mortality. Skeletal muscle retains its plasticity in response to anabolic stimuli such as exercise in COPD and is therefore a promising target for novel pharmacological therapies aimed at reducing disability and healthcare utilisation and improving mortality. In this article, we outline the steps the academic and pharmaceutical communities need to undertake for such therapeutic advances to be realised.

Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; externally peer reviewed.